Imagining Extinction

Imagining Extinction

Author: Ursula K. Heise

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226358338

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

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We are currently facing the sixth mass extinction of species in the history of life on Earth, biologists claim—the first one caused by humans. Activists, filmmakers, writers, and artists are seeking to bring the crisis to the public’s attention through stories and images that use the strategies of elegy, tragedy, epic, and even comedy. Imagining Extinction is the first book to examine the cultural frameworks shaping these narratives and images. Ursula K. Heise argues that understanding these stories and symbols is indispensable for any effective advocacy on behalf of endangered species. More than that, she shows how biodiversity conservation, even and especially in its scientific and legal dimensions, is shaped by cultural assumptions about what is valuable in nature and what is not. These assumptions are hardwired into even seemingly neutral tools such as biodiversity databases and laws for the protection of endangered species. Heise shows that the conflicts and convergences of biodiversity conservation with animal welfare advocacy, environmental justice, and discussions about the Anthropocene open up a new vision of multispecies justice. Ultimately, Imagining Extinction demonstrates that biodiversity, endangered species, and extinction are not only scientific questions but issues of histories, cultures, and values.
Imagining Extinction
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Ursula K. Heise
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-08-10 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

We are currently facing the sixth mass extinction of species in the history of life on Earth, biologists claim—the first one caused by humans. Activists, filmmakers, writers, and artists are seeking to bring the crisis to the public’s attention through stories and images that use the strategies of elegy, tragedy,
Imagining Extinction
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Ursula K. Heise
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-08-10 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

La 4e de couverture de la jaquette indique : "How should science be written? It is a question that piqued natural philosophers of the seventeenth century as they experimented with the rhetorical figures, neologisms, verse-forms, and generic variety that characterise the literary texture of their work. Inspired laymen were quick
Ecocollapse Fiction and Cultures of Human Extinction
Language: en
Pages: 168
Authors: Sarah E. McFarland
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-01-28 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

This work analyzes 21st-century realistic speculations of human extinction: fictions that imagine future worlds without interventions of as-yet uninvented technology, interplanetary travel, or other science fiction elements that provide hope for rescue or long-term survival. Climate change fiction as a genre of apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic writing usually resists facing the
Reconsidering Extinction in Terms of the History of Global Bioethics
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Stan Booth, Chris Mounsey
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-21 - Publisher: Routledge

Reconsidering Extinction in Terms of the History of Global Bioethics continues the Routledge Advances in the History of Bioethics series by exploring approaches to the bioethics of extinction from disparate disciplines, from literature, to social sciences, to history, to sustainability studies, to linguistics. Van Rensselaer Potter coined the phrase “Global
Fiction and the Sixth Mass Extinction
Language: en
Pages: 178
Authors: Jonathan Elmore
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-04-01 - Publisher: Lexington Books

Fiction and the Sixth Mass Extinction is one of the first works to focus specifically on fiction’s engagements with human driven extinction. Drawing together a diverse group of scholars and approaches, this volume pairs established voices in the field with emerging scholars and traditionally recognized climate fiction ('cli-fi') with texts