Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First-Century Irish Novel

Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First-Century Irish Novel

Author: Kathleen Costello-Sullivan

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815654339

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 194

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The desire to engage and confront traumatic subjects was a facet of Irish literature for much of the twentieth century. Yet, just as Irish society has adopted a more direct and open approach to the past, so too have Irish authors evolved in their response to, and literary uses of, trauma. In Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First-Century Irish Novel, Costello-Sullivan considers the ways in which the Irish canon not only represents an ongoing awareness of trauma as a literary and cultural force, but also how this representation has shifted since the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first century. While earlier trauma narratives center predominantly on the role of silence and the individual and/or societal suffering that traumas induce, twenty-first-century Irish narratives increasingly turn from just the recognition of traumatic experiences toward exploring and representing the process of healing and recovery both structurally and narratively. Through a series of keenly observed close readings, Costello-Sullivan explores the work of Colm Tóibín, John Banville, Anne Enright, Emma Donohue, Colum McCann, and Sebastian Barry. In highlighting the power of narrative to amend and address memory and trauma, Costello-Sullivan argues that these works reflect a movement beyond merely representing trauma toward also representing the possibility of recovery from it.
Trauma and Recovery in the Twenty-First-Century Irish Novel
Language: en
Pages: 194
Authors: Kathleen Costello-Sullivan
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-05-07 - Publisher: Syracuse University Press

The desire to engage and confront traumatic subjects was a facet of Irish literature for much of the twentieth century. Yet, just as Irish society has adopted a more direct and open approach to the past, so too have Irish authors evolved in their response to, and literary uses of,
Ireland, the Irish, and the Rise of Biofiction
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Michael Lackey
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-04 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

Biofiction is literature that names its protagonist after an actual historical figure, and it has become a dominant literary form over the last 35 years. What has not yet been scholarly acknowledged or documented is that the Irish played a crucial role in the origins, evolution, rise, and now dominance
The Body in Pain in Irish Literature and Culture
Language: en
Pages: 283
Authors: Fionnuala Dillane, Naomi McAreavey, Emilie Pine
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-12-06 - Publisher: Springer

This book elucidates the ways the pained and suffering body has been registered and mobilized in specifically Irish contexts across more than four hundred years of literature and culture. There is no singular approach to what pain means: the material addressed in this collection covers diverse cultural forms, from reports
The Contemporary Irish Detective Novel
Language: en
Pages: 168
Authors: Elizabeth Mannion
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-30 - Publisher: Springer

Irish detective fiction has enjoyed an international readership for over a decade, appearing on best-seller lists across the globe. But its breadth of hard-boiled and amateur detectives, historical fiction, and police procedurals has remained somewhat marginalized in academic scholarship. Exploring the work of some of its leading writers—including Peter Tremayne,
Laying Out the Bones
Language: en
Pages: 236
Authors: Bridget English
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-12-01 - Publisher: Syracuse University Press

English sheds new light on death and dying in twentieth- and twenty-first century Irish literature as she examines the ways that Irish wake and funeral rituals shape novelistic discourse. She argues that the treatment of death in Irish novels offers a way of making sense of mortality and provides insight